Tag : content

Content Calendar

How to Generate Your Content Calendar

The holiday season is officially behind us! Your holiday marketing is done for 2016, the holiday shopping discounts have passed, and you’re counting down the days until next year’s holiday fun fest.

Now that you know how to expertly pull together my favorite Google Analytics reports for the holidays, you could take your marketing one step further and perfect your holiday marketing calendar-planning skills. My marketing calendar (and free template!) gives you a handful of global and national honored holidays along with some other quirky holidays that might spark a little personality in your brand.

If you haven’t started planning for 2017 yet, now is the time to start, whether it’s the Facebook ads whisking your customers away to somewhere tropical during summertime, heading to Snapchat for an Oscar-winning filter for awards season, or just ramping up your evergreen content for daily brand happenings.

Content Calander

If used correctly, my marketing calendar can be amazingly entertaining– and drive ROI.

To help maximize your 2017 holiday marketing goals, I’ve also put together a list of every holiday in 2017 you’ll want to have on your radar. You already have the basics like evergreen content, so think about the stuff you “need” (want) that you might not have done in the past. From a Valentine’s Day Deal to an LBGTQ event, this article will give you the 2017 marketing calendar ho-ho-hook up.

4 Elements of an ROI-Driving Marketing Calendar
Of course, every marketer has their definition of what makes a marketing calendar great. That’s what makes every year so fun. For me, a great marketing calendar:

-Is a tool that drives sales
-Has a campaign you are proud to be a part of
-Champions its customers year-round
-Raises the bar for next year
-One business I admire that surpasses all marketing efforts year-after-year is Whole Foods. Not only do they listen to their customers (they launched their rewards program to help reduce prices), but they offer personalized products year round (like these holiday chocolate bars perfect for my binge-watching of holiday movies).

Binge-watching w/ chocolate bars to rewards programs, @WholeFoods is an example of marketing done right.
3 Questions Every Marketer Should Ask Themselves Before Building a Calendar
1. Is the holiday relevant to my brand?

Only choose holidays that will fulfill your end goal.

2. Can I focus on one holiday at a time?

You don’t want your customers to feel like you’re interrogating them. If you want quality engagement, you need to give consumers time.

3. Is there a theme relevant to my brand every month?

If you can choose a theme for every month, you can narrow down the holiday marketing you want your brand to participate in.

Reading iPad

Top 5 Reasons Readers Aren’t Finishing Your Content

That means most readers aren’t getting anywhere near the call to action at the end of your content, much less clicking that link and engaging more deeply with you.

What makes a reader turn back rather than keep reading? Even if that’s true, there are also a few common content mistakes that make readers run for the hills.

It’s depressing, but surprising? Maybe not. You’ve probably done it yourself after searching for something online: Click the first link, skim the first paragraph, click the back button, repeat.

As a content marketer, I ‘d like to think people are always completely engrossed by my content, that from the very first word of a blog post or eBook, they’re hooked, that each carefully crafted sentence makes them want to read the next, and the next – all the way to the very end.

I’ve seen enough statistics to know that for most online content, that’s not the case: One out of three people spends less than 15 seconds reading an article they come across online – on average, a reader will only consume 20% of the content on a page.

1. It’s full of errors

Those errors point to bigger issues. It makes me wonder if you’re actually an authority on the subject, or if you’re so focused on pumping out a huge quantity of content that you fail to focus on the quality of it. Either way, it’s a big red flag, and I’m going to continue my reading elsewhere.

To me, grammatical errors mean one thing: You don’t take your content seriously.

2. It doesn’t look good

Today’s readers skim. They look at the headline and subheads and bullet points in your content to try to absorb as much information as possible in the smallest amount of time. If they show up to your content and it’s a big wall-o-text, they’re not going to stick around.

What if a reader visits a link on his mobile device, but the content doesn’t adjust to fit his screen? While you may be focused on the quality of the content, you should also consider the design of the page.

3. It morphed into a sales pitch

They draw you in, promising content that’s going to rock your world, then deliver a big fat disappointment. The same thing happens with a lot of content marketing.

The thing is, the purpose of content marketing is to build trust, to educate your audience, to show them that you’re an expert in your field. And when they come to an article expecting to learn, only to realize halfway through it’s a thinly veiled sales pitch, they lose that trust.

When people realize they’re being sold to – especially when they’re not ready to be sold to – they leave.

4. It’s been done a million times before

Your audience wants to read your information. Your headline drew them in, they found the link through your newsletter, or the link showed up on a Google search. They got there, they got there because they’re interested in that topic.

To keep your readers engaged through the end, you have to learn to present information in an interesting, fresh way.

What they don’t want is the same information that they’ve read 100 times before. If they’re still looking for that information, it means they haven’t found what they’re looking for – so if you’re just mimicking the information that’s already out there, they’re not going to stay for long.

5. It doesn’t interest readers

Even if that’s true, there are also a few common content mistakes that make readers run for the hills.

Sometimes, people come across your content, read a few paragraphs, and – gasp – realize they’re not interested. It’s just not what they’re looking for.

If you’re doing your job of developing interesting, compelling content for your audience, the main party it’s going to attract is your audience. And if other readers stumble upon that content and decide they want to leave, I say let ’em (because they probably weren’t ever going to buy from you anyway).

What if a reader visits a link on his mobile device, but the content doesn’t adjust to fit his screen? Sometimes, people come across your content, read a few paragraphs, and – gasp – realize they’re not interested. If you’re doing your job of developing interesting, compelling content for your audience, the main party it’s going to attract is your audience. And if other readers stumble upon that content and decide they want to leave, I say let ’em (because they probably weren’t ever going to buy from you anyway).

Rather than asking you to focus solely on creating great content, I challenge you to focus on great content, smart design, an honest headline, thorough proofreading, and correct audience targeting – all with a unique perspective. Creating that kind of content is hard, but worth it.