Tag : linkedin

The “What” & “Why” Social Media Management Costs What it Does

How much am I looking at when hiring a social media management team? This is a very common question when starting to look at scaling your business in today’s technology advanced marketplace.

Social Media and Digital marketing practices take time & resources far beyond the average business owner’s understanding. And guess what…

…that’s okay!

Linkedin Mistake To Avoid Image (1)

5 Posts to AVOID Sharing on LinkedIn

Do you ever pause just before hitting the Share button when posting on LinkedIn?

Have you ever wondered if what you’re about to post will hurt or improve your personal brand and authority on LinkedIn?

It can be hard to know what are the best kinds of content to post and which you should avoid, especially when the topic is current, relevant and, perhaps, even controversial.

While controversial posts will often get the most engagement and comments, do you really want people to associate that topic or content with you?

You may even be thinking that if you just share the post and don’t provide your own opinion or comment that people won’t think that you’re for or against a particular side. But often just by posting, your connections will make assumption and form an opinion, which may or may not be in your favor.

I am going to show a number of example posts and share why you may or may not want to share these types of posts on LinkedIn. Remember that LinkedIn is very different from Twitter or Facebook, it’s a professional network, full of potential prospects who may not share your world view. And by posting in a way that conflicts with their views, you could hurt your ability to connect and build a relationship with them.

When in doubt, the best rule of thumb is to always keep it professional and avoid all negativity.

Here are 4 types of LinkedIn posts you should avoid sharing as well as four examples that can help your engagement and build your personal brand.

1. Controversial Posts

As LinkedIn is a professional network full of clients, potential clients, industry peers and other people in professional relationships with you, it’s a good idea to avoid topics that tend to polarize people, especially controversial ones with a negative connotation.

This is not because these topics are not important or relevant, but because LinkedIn’s not the correct platform for those discussions.

Because these topics do polarize people, it can invoke the age old “you are either with us or against us”. In these scenarios, if you fall on opposite sides of your clients or other professional relationships, this can hurt your business and your personal brand.

It’s better to avoid posting, or even commenting on, these types of posts altogether.

Twitter negative post

2. Political or Religious Posts

These are two topics that people feel extremely passionate about. Just like with controversial topics, these types of posts tend to see people join one camp or another, and your connections can take great offense if you believe differently than they do.

Again I would recommend that you avoid posting or commenting on these types of posts.

3. Sales Pitch Posts

While LinkedIn is the best platform for B2B, it’s most effective when you use it as a platform to build relationships, rather than as a place to broadcast your sales material.

While some businesses can make sales directly on the platform, most will need to build relationships with clients so they can move the relationship to the place where they can have a sales conversation, usually offline.

Any ads and sales pitches in status updates will often be ignored by your connections and can, in some cases, hurt how they see your brand.

Focus on providing value and being the go to resource for your ideal clients, so that when they need someone who does what you do, you’re the first person that comes to mind.

social-media-roundup-bad-social-media-10-728

4. Too Much Personal Information Posts

I’ll say it again – LinkedIn is a professional social media platform. It’s not Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest or Snapchat.

While you should be social, you can be social AND professional at the same time. That means no cat memes, no posts of what you ate for lunch (unless it’s relevant to your profession), no drinking/partying pics and absolutely no negativity.

In the example post below you will see as one commenter points out that the author of the update has given out sensitive information that allows viewers to determine her underage daughter’s age, name, city and industry of employment. This is information that she probably did not intend for the potentially hundreds (or more) strangers in her extended network to see.

4 LinkedIn Posts That Can Help You Stand Out & Improve Engagement

1. Timely & Relevant Posts

There’s no better way to create conversation with your connections (helping you to stay top of mind) and increase your engagement than to post on timely and relevant topics in your industry or the professional world in general.

The key is to pick topics that are generally positive in nature and that in some way affect you (and some of your connections).

Here are a couple of status update examples that share a relevant and timely topic that have received a lot of engagement.

2. Conversation Inspiring Posts

While you want to avoid negative, non-business related topics, it can be good to post on topics that can inspire productive debate on important issues in your industry or the business world.

Both the content and how you present it should be thoughtful and inspire productive conversation rather than emotionally heated debates.

3. Professional Wins & Changes Posts

As this is a social network, and you’re looking to build relationships with people (which requires them to get to know, like and trust you), you also want to include a personal element in some of your posts.

A great way to occasionally add a bit of yourself into your LinkedIn status updates is to share relevant professional or work related wins and changes.

This could be a new job, a promotion, getting a new client or a lesson learned.

4. Personal Touch Posts

You might be thinking, “but you just said to keep it professional”.

And I did.

But very occasionally and done correctly, it can be beneficial to share a little piece of your life outside of your work with your connections.

While both this example and the earlier example with too much personal info have a work related theme (which is ideal), the difference between the examples is that in this one, the author doesn’t give away information that could endanger his daughter. The post also leaves you with a great bit of wisdom (which could only come from a small child).

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Wrapping Up

I hope you’ve found these examples of what not to post and what to post on LinkedIn helpful.

A great way to test if something would make a good update would be to ask yourself, “is this something that I would want posted and associated with me on the front of a large and popular newspaper?” If you still feel passionately about posting something controversial, ask yourself if you’re willing to lose customers or potential prospects who might disagree or be offended by your point of view.

While opinions and experiences will vary, these general guides should help you stay on track to maximize your LinkedIn presence.

Have you ever posted something on LinkedIn and received negative backlash from it? Let me know in the comments below.

Now Would Be a Good Time to Publish with LinkedIn

With Microsoft’s latest purchase of LinkedIn, one of the largest business social media platforms today, it would be a good idea to start becoming much more active with the juggernaut publishing platform.

…Wait, I can publish content with LinkedIn, not just share content, or post quick updates?

YEP!

I’ve always said you don’t have to be anointed as an influencer to build online influence! It’s up to you to contribute to your audience, share valuable experiences, and create solid content that shows your thought leadership.

The LinkedIn publishing platform gives you the opportunity to expand your reach in a major way. Since all LinkedIn members have access to the platform, it’s critical for you to create high-quality content that differentiates you.

Your published posts show up at the top of your LinkedIn profile.

With the LinkedIn publishing platform, you can follow other publishers and build your own followers in the process. While your LinkedIn followers have the potential to see your LinkedIn posts, they aren’t official network connections. (It’s similar to LinkedIn’s current model for following LinkedIn-appointed influencers.)

Any posts you publish on LinkedIn are tied to your professional profile and show up near the top of your profile. This means your thought leadership insights are showcased when someone views your LinkedIn profile.

The first post we published to LinkedIn helped me attract over 200 new followers, and my profile views were up 38% week over week! These stats tell me that the LinkedIn publishing platform is going to be a great place to share longer-form, thought leadership content.

(Related Resource: Digitally Speaking – “Plain English” Online Marketing Resource & Training Library)

#1: Create Valuable, Attractive Content

Before you start posting, have a plan in place. What content is most useful for your audience? Is your post too salesy? Although there’s no formal editorial process, LinkedIn makes it clear that sales-oriented content won’t be tolerated (after all, that’s what the advertising platform is for).

LinkedIn has some helpful guidelines in their Help Center about what to publish. This is a good reference for understanding how to frame your content so it resonates with and adds value to both your established audience and your potential audience (which will now be even greater than your existing LinkedIn network).

Make sure your posts are scannable.

The general guidelines we’ve seen (including LinkedIn’s) recommend keeping posts between 400 and 600 words and publish weekly. However, you could certainly experiment with these parameters and determine what works best for you.

Like other social networks, people want to consume information quickly. Make it easy for them by creating scannable, attractive content. A few best practices are using a compelling headline, placing an eye-catching image at the top of your posts, bolding important text and breaking up longer paragraphs.

Feel free to enhance your articles with YouTube videos or content from SlideShare to make them as interesting and useful as possible.

When you’re ready to write an article on the LinkedIn publishing platform, it’s pretty easy. Go to your LinkedIn home page and look for the pencil icon in the box at the top where you would typically share an update.

When you click the pencil icon, you’ll see the publishing editor. This is where you create your post.

LinkedIn’s publishing editor is very simple to use. It’s similar to the WordPress editor or Microsoft Word. You can type or paste your text into the editor and format it right there.

Does your LinkedIn post have a bio section? You’ll need to create a bio at the end of each post. Your bio should include a sentence or two about who you are, what you do and who you help, a link to your website or blog or even a specific call to action.

It’s a good idea to make the most of all of your resources. In my bio below, I’ve linked my name to my Google+ profile, and on my Google+ profile I added LinkedIn to the list of sites I contribute to. This ensures that Google picks up my authorship profile for my LinkedIn posts.

Be sure to create a bio section at the end of every post you publish!

Before you hit Publish, please be sure to review your post and check it for grammar and spelling (the Preview option is helpful here). But if you don’t catch everything, you can go back and edit your post any time.

(Related Resource: Digitally Speaking – “Plain English” Online Marketing Resource & Training Library)

#2: Share Your Post Everywhere

To maximize your reach and engagement inside and outside of LinkedIn, share your post on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and Google+. If you have a LinkedIn company page, share it there as well (assuming your post is relevant to your company page’s followers).

This kind of aggregate social networking adds credibility and encourages more shares and engagement across the social web. In turn, all of that engagement sends social signals to Google’s search algorithm and can help increase your visibility in online searches!

#3: Manage Your Post Comments (Very Important!)

You’ve written a useful post, you’ve promoted it far and wide and people are reading it. After all that effort and exposure, don’t forget to check your comments!

In the Comments section of your post, you can respond to and interact with members who are leaving feedback or starting a discussion.

Don’t forget to respond to comments on your posts!

In most cases, those who commented on my posts were people I’m not currently connected to. That means the post is getting visibility beyond my first-degree network, and yours probably will too. Unfortunately I did see one or two spam comments when I posted, but you have the ability to hide and/or flag these.

#4: Evaluate Content Performance

LinkedIn immediately starts to show you the number of views, social media shares and comments your post generates. I admit that it’s exciting to see those metrics changing right before your eyes in real time!

Use your LinkedIn post metrics to determine how well your content is resonating with your audience. As you build your professional content library, compare your posts to see which ones outperformed others.

When you have a feel for what’s working for you, take some time to review the posts of your favorite official LinkedIn influencers and your competitors. Evaluate their posting schedule and which posts got the most views and engagement. Consider how you can use similar tactics for your own success.

Evaluate what your favorite influencers are writing about.

Seeing what’s working gives you an idea of what people are responding to and you may want to consider using similar topics or how-to’s that appeal to your own audience.

Learning from the LinkedIn influencers who have gone before you can help you craft a more successful content strategy of your own!

Keep Your Existing Blog!

It’s critical to remember that LinkedIn’s publishing platform shouldn’t serve as your content publishing hub. It’s a place to syndicate and further showcase your existing professional content from your blog.

Remember, you don’t own your LinkedIn presence or the content associated with it.

I recommend publishing the original post to your own blog first, then publishing it to your LinkedIn profile in its entirety.

You may want to vary the two posts a bit, however. Perhaps write your blog post to your specific audience or niche, and when you publish it to LinkedIn, change it to appeal to a broader audience.

The LinkedIn publishing platform is an important part of any marketer’s content strategy. I think it will be interesting to watch the network grow as an online content destination for professionals.

Talk Soon!

Jos. M. & Alexander J. Kubicek, CMC & CCAS

MatchPLUS eMarketing Group, LLC

P: 412-374-1558

C: 412-215-3650

www.MPeMG.com

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The Social Media Grind

Today’s blog post comes from Steve Cartwright. He is a great contributor to the community of Digital Marketing and we felt that this short piece would shed a light on the “Social Media Grind.”

 

It seems as if everyone uses social media and as a business owner it makes perfect sense to use social media marketing to get the word out about your business, products and services. However you also need to understand that social media marketing has the potential to draw you in and become a major time waster and even worse still your customers can often see you doing this. If you want to ensure that social media is not controlling you at work, follow these tips.

Social Media Zombies

Have a Plan of Action

If you fail to plan, you are going to waste an awful lot of time on social media so don’t do anything without a plan, as this will help ensure social media marketing will work well for your business.

Create a Social Media Publication Calendar

Plan your posts ahead of time and schedule posts in accordance with what you specifically want to promote, making sure all of your updates have a purpose. If you have a calendar with pre-written posts, you can easily schedule them to work to meet your business goal.

Avoid Time Sucker Activities

It’s way too easy to get suckered into yet another personality quiz or discussions about what one of your friends had for dinner, or perhaps you’ll get suckered into playing some sort of game or commenting on some cute picture or a million and one other things. It’s fine to do all of this, but do it after work is complete and you are on your own time clock.

Outsource Scheduling

Once you create a publication calendar that matches your promotions you can give the list of updates to someone else, your virtual assistance for example to schedule and monitor. However, don’t make that an excuse not to engage personally and share your opinion.

Take Time to Comment and Engage

Even if you outsource parts of your social media marketing, be sure to personally comment and engage your followers so that they know you are a real person to trust and know you.

Do More of What Works

If you do something that works, do more of it and less of what isn’t working for you. Monitor the metrics of everything that you do so that you are positive about what is working and what is not working, simple isn’t it?

Each Post Needs a Reason for Being

Don’t post something without a purpose. If you don’t know why you are posting it, don’t post it.

Don’t Forget Your Call to Action

Everything you do should have a CTA. Whether it is to share, follow, or click, ensure clarity about what you want your audience members to do. If they know what you want them to do, they’re more likely to do it.

Using social media correctly to market your business is an essential marketing technique today in the world of advertising and marketing. Social media marketing can be very effective and pretty inexpensive if you are careful not to waste time and effort on messing around and doing things that have no purpose.

LinkedIn Has A Publishing Platform???

strategyLinkedIn Has A Publishing Platform???

I’ve always said you don’t have to be anointed as an influencer to build online influence! It’s up to you to contribute to your audience, share valuable experiences, and create solid content that shows your thought leadership.

The LinkedIn publishing platform gives you the opportunity to expand your reach in a major way. Since all LinkedIn members have access to the platform, it’s critical for you to create high-quality content that differentiates you.

Your published posts show up at the top of your LinkedIn profile.

With the LinkedIn publishing platform, you can follow other publishers and build your own followers in the process. While your LinkedIn followers have the potential to see your LinkedIn posts, they aren’t official network connections. (It’s similar to LinkedIn’s current model for following LinkedIn-appointed influencers.)

Any posts you publish on LinkedIn are tied to your professional profile and show up near the top of your profile. This means your thought leadership insights are showcased when someone views your LinkedIn profile.

The first post we published to LinkedIn helped me attract over 200 new followers, and my profile views were up 38% week over week! These stats tell me that the LinkedIn publishing platform is going to be a great place to share longer-form, thought leadership content.

#1: Create Valuable, Attractive Content

Before you start posting, have a plan in place. What content is most useful for your audience? Is your post too salesy? Although there’s no formal editorial process, LinkedIn makes it clear that sales-oriented content won’t be tolerated (after all, that’s what the advertising platform is for).

LinkedIn has some helpful guidelines in their Help Center about what to publish. This is a good reference for understanding how to frame your content so it resonates with and adds value to both your established audience and your potential audience (which will now be even greater than your existing LinkedIn network).

Make sure your posts are scannable.

The general guidelines we’ve seen (including LinkedIn’s) recommend keeping posts between 400 and 600 words and publish weekly. However, you could certainly experiment with these parameters and determine what works best for you.

Like other social networks, people want to consume information quickly. Make it easy for them by creating scannable, attractive content. A few best practices are using a compelling headline, placing an eye-catching image at the top of your posts, bolding important text and breaking up longer paragraphs.

Feel free to enhance your articles with YouTube videos or content from SlideShare to make them as interesting and useful as possible.

When you’re ready to write an article on the LinkedIn publishing platform, it’s pretty easy. Go to your LinkedIn home page and look for the pencil icon in the box at the top where you would typically share an update.

When you click the pencil icon, you’ll see the publishing editor. This is where you create your post.

LinkedIn’s publishing editor is very simple to use. It’s similar to the WordPress editor or Microsoft Word. You can type or paste your text into the editor and format it right there.

Does your LinkedIn post have a bio section? You’ll need to create a bio at the end of each post. Your bio should include a sentence or two about who you are, what you do and who you help, a link to your website or blog or even a specific call to action.

It’s a good idea to make the most of all of your resources. In my bio below, I’ve linked my name to my Google+ profile, and on my Google+ profile I added LinkedIn to the list of sites I contribute to. This ensures that Google picks up my authorship profile for my LinkedIn posts.

Be sure to create a bio section at the end of every post you publish!

Before you hit Publish, please be sure to review your post and check it for grammar and spelling (the Preview option is helpful here). But if you don’t catch everything, you can go back and edit your post any time.

#2: Share Your Post Everywhere

To maximize your reach and engagement inside and outside of LinkedIn, share your post on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and Google+. If you have a LinkedIn company page, share it there as well (assuming your post is relevant to your company page’s followers).

This kind of aggregate social networking adds credibility and encourages more shares and engagement across the social web. In turn, all of that engagement sends social signals to Google’s search algorithm and can help increase your visibility in online searches!

 

#3: Manage Your Post Comments

You’ve written a useful post, you’ve promoted it far and wide and people are reading it. After all that effort and exposure, don’t forget to check your comments!

In the Comments section of your post, you can respond to and interact with members who are leaving feedback or starting a discussion.

Don’t forget to respond to comments on your posts!

In most cases, those who commented on my posts were people I’m not currently connected to. That means the post is getting visibility beyond my first-degree network, and yours probably will too. Unfortunately I did see one or two spam comments when I posted, but you have the ability to hide and/or flag these.

#4: Evaluate Content Performance

LinkedIn immediately starts to show you the number of views, social media shares and comments your post generates. I admit that it’s exciting to see those metrics changing right before your eyes in real time!

Use your LinkedIn post metrics to determine how well your content is resonating with your audience. As you build your professional content library, compare your posts to see which ones outperformed others.

When you have a feel for what’s working for you, take some time to review the posts of your favorite official LinkedIn influencers and your competitors. Evaluate their posting schedule and which posts got the most views and engagement. Consider how you can use similar tactics for your own success.

Evaluate what your favorite influencers are writing about.

Seeing what’s working gives you an idea of what people are responding to and you may want to consider using similar topics or how-to’s that appeal to your own audience.

Learning from the LinkedIn influencers who have gone before you can help you craft a more successful content strategy of your own!

Keep Your Existing Blog!

It’s critical to remember that LinkedIn’s publishing platform shouldn’t serve as your content publishing hub. It’s a place to syndicate and further showcase your existing professional content from your blog.

Remember, you don’t own your LinkedIn presence or the content associated with it.

I recommend publishing the original post to your own blog first, then publishing it to your LinkedIn profile in its entirety.

You may want to vary the two posts a bit, however. Perhaps write your blog post to your specific audience or niche, and when you publish it to LinkedIn, change it to appeal to a broader audience.

The LinkedIn publishing platform is an important part of any marketer’s content strategy. I think it will be interesting to watch the network grow as an online content destination for professionals.