Tag : PPC

MArketing Automation Do's & Don'ts

Marketing Automation Do’s & Don’ts

Now that we’ve detailed out what marketing automation is, we want to give you a few tips as you think about implementing a new platform into your process. This will outline what you should and should not be doing with your marketing automation.

Facebook Ad Mistake

The #1 Mistake With Your Facebook Ads

Facebook ad targeting is powerful. That, in conjunction with these simple yet effective notes from Mari Smith, will likely lead to a significant boost in your Facebook ad performance.

With that being the case, why do Facebook ads fail? That targeting potential, those intricate audience reach possibilities and insights, they’re largely not being used by brands advertising on Facebook.

Mobile app advertising agency, Consumer Acquisition, tested 100,000 Facebook ads and recommend that you don’t rely on stock imagery. Use images of regular, every day happy women or children, depending on your industry and offer,” Smith said.

Of course, this is just my research – this is not a wide-scale study. I sought to reiterate my findings by asking a Facebook marketing expert for her thoughts on the matter. That expert, Mari Smith, provided the below response.

“Ads that look and feel salesey and hypey do not perform as well as ads that are friendly, relationship oriented, and more informal. On Facebook’s Q4 2014 earnings call, Mark Zuckerberg stated that the company’s goal is to reach a point where the ads are “as relevant and timely as the content your friends share with you.”.

For every Facebook ad you’re served, each time a sponsored post shows up in your News Feed, there’s a background logic at work which determines why you’ve see it. Sometimes the explanation will be entirely logical – I’m a fan of basketball so I’ll sometimes get ‘people who are interested in basketball’ as an ad targeting option, which makes sense. Other times – in fact, in the vast majority of cases I investigated (70%), the ad targeting I’m seeing is like the above.

Not all of them were targeted like this. The ads that reached me that were of most relevance, based on my interests and activities, either came from social media companies (who you ‘d expect would have a fair idea of how to use advanced targeting):

Good Facebook Ad Audience
Facebook ads can be targeted down to most minute of interests and behaviors, the most intricate audience matches can be used to reach highly relevant audiences with your paid campaigns. Lookalike audiences (which Hootsuite have used in the above example) are one way to go – they examine your existing customer e-mail lists and find similar people, based on their Facebook details – that’s one way to ensure you’re reaching more relevant audiences. On top of that, profiling your own Facebook community, researching the communities of your competitors, examining the commonalities and correlations that exist between your customers – this can lead to more targeted, and more effective, Facebook ads because you’re reaching people based on what they’re interested in, not on vague outlines of who they are.

Because Facebook is arguably the most advanced advertising platform ever created. Over time, Facebook’s been able to construct intricate profiles of who we are, what we like, what we do – pretty much everything about us can be gleaned from our Facebook activities. With that level of possible insight into each one of its 1.55 billion users worldwide, surely Facebook ads, when used well, can reach the right audiences.

If this advertiser were to see poor results from Facebook ads, I wouldn’t be surprised – and as noted, the vast majority of ads I see use this type of vague audience targeting, targeting. Maybe, though that’s also fairly presumptuous – all I can say, for sure, is that the majority the ads being served to me and the various other profiles I had access to over the last few months are not using any advanced targeting – they’re all broad, vague, and no doubt significantly less effective as a result.

” Another reason for Facebook ad failure is the ad and landing page are incongruent. If the web page doesn’t connect with the ad in terms of visuals, ad copy, offer and simplicity, the user will quickly click off.”.

For reference, ‘People aged 25 to 44 in Australia’ is a total potential audience of 6.4 million – so it’s a very broad range, something Facebook does try to warn you about in the ad process.
“Facebook ads don’t work”. “Facebook’s stealing our reach and forcing us to pay for ads”, “Facebook paid ads don’t deliver great results”. And while I don’t doubt that some are seeing poor ad results through Facebook, in general, my internal response to this is criticism is “you’re probably not doing it right”.

That’s three paragraphs of absolutely golden advice from one of the best in the business – if you want to improve the results of your Facebook ad efforts, this serves as a perfect blueprint from which to work from.

” I agree with you on the poor ad targeting. I ‘d like to add further thoughts about visuals and landing pages,” Smith said.

These ads tended to be more in tune with my interests and actions – some of those through the Ad Exchange partners, in particular, were highly targeted. The takeaway from this is brands need to learn about Facebook ad targeting.

Organic Vs. Paid Traffic & Which Works Best

Is it better to use paid search (PPC) versus organic search marketing? Sounds like a simple question, but the answer is much more complex. Both methods have specific benefits and drawbacks. Let’s discuss some major differences and consider the best approach.

Organic vs. Paid traffic Image
According to ComScore, search engine users conducted 18.6 billion explicit core searches in April 2014. That number excluded searches without specific intent to interact with the search results. The search engine result pages (SERPs) likely provided a mix of both organic and paid rankings.

Both organic and paid (PPC) have distinct advantages and drawbacks. Knowing them will allow you to get the best return for your search marketing dollars. As you will see, combining them will often result in a better click-through rate (CTR).

Paid vs Organic Search

Organic Search: Organic search results are the listings of Web pages returned by the search engine’s algorithms that closely match the search string of keywords. Marketers use SEO and content assets to get high search engine rankings. That’s because the advantages of organic search are dependent on visibility.

Organic Search Benefits:
Trust and credibility: With high search engine rankings comes a perception of credibility on the part of searchers. High search rankings imply industry authority and leadership. This perception translates into more trust and a greater likelihood to click-through to the site.
Evergreen: If the content that ranks high is evergreen, then the rankings will also have a more evergreen presence. The specific listing may rank high long after the content was created.

Ranking: Once you get high rankings, it’s easier to keep those rankings. You get authority status and build the trust of users and search engines.
Click through rates: For “top of funnel” search terms, I.e., don’t show immediate purchase intent, the click-through rates are better for organic search results. That’s very important for businesses that have a longer buying cycle.
Inbound marketing: An organic search strategy requires marketers to develop the content assets to achieve it. This is important for higher involvement purchases. Users interact with content as they move down the purchase funnel.

Organic Search Drawbacks:
Time: Depending on the competitiveness of the keywords involved, it may take months or years to get high rankings. Can you wait that long?

Resources: Getting high rankings requires both creating content and using SEO tactics to achieve it. That can be difficult, frustrating and time-consuming. Either internal staff or external contractors are needed for both these functions.

Paid Search (PPC): Paid search results are advertisements. The advantages and drawbacks of paid search are often the opposite of organic listings.

Paid Ads (PPC) Benefits:
Time: Unlike organic search rankings that can take months or years, paid results are placed at the top of rankings as soon as you pay for ad placement.
Targeting: PPC campaigns can be tailored to reach specific audiences. Examples of segmentation include geo-targeting, income, age, educational level, marital status, industry, etc.

Click through rates: Searches using terms that denote high purchase intent such as product or brand-specific keywords will get more clicks than organic results. The advantage of paid search can clearly be seen in the Internet retailers MarketLive Performance Index data. For the year 2013 as a whole, PPC accounted for 36.5 % of search traffic but an outsized 47.9 % of revenue from search.

Paid Ads (PPC) Drawbacks
Cost: The more competitive the keyword, the more the bid price is for each click on the displayed ad. Paid search requires a level of expertise to manage these campaigns. Otherwise a lot of money will be spent to attract unqualified traffic.
Momentary: The ads disappear as soon as you stop paying for them.
Distrust: Consumers don’t always trust paid ads and often avoid them. They place more trust in organic rankings.

Click through rate: Except for high purchase intent searches, users will click on paid search listings at a lower rate than organic search listings. Organic listings have more credibility with search engine users. Organic rankings will get more click-through rates for “top of funnel” keyword search queries.
For many businesses, the best approach is a mix of both organic and paid search results. The advantage of this approach is that organic rankings give a business credibility and evergreen search results.

Paid Vs Organic Search Rank

According to a Google study, paid search ads with an accompanying organic search result only occur 19 % of the time, on average. Nine percent of the time a search ad shows with an organic ad in the top rank. Google’s results showed that 50 % of ad clicks did not replace the clicks on the first organic search listing when the ads didn’t appear.

The Bottom Line

So, should you use paid search or organic search for your marketing? It depends. It depends on your marketing needs. It depends on which method gives you the best CTR or ROI. Whether paid or organic search is better depends on purchase intent displayed by the search query. What we do know is that “together is better.”.

Is it better to use paid search (PPC) versus organic search marketing? Organic Search: Organic search results are the listings of Web pages returned by the search engine’s algorithms that closely match the search string of keywords. Click through rate: Except for high purchase intent searches, users will click on paid search listings at a lower rate than organic search listings. According to a Google study, paid search ads with an accompanying organic search result only occur 19 % of the time, on average. Whether paid or organic search is better depends on purchase intent displayed by the search query.