Tag : ratings

Why Do I Need Online Reputation Management?

Why Do I Need Reputation Management-You’ve spent years building your business. You’ve invested time, sweat, and tears. You’ve missed dance recitals and soccer games as you’ve toiled to create it. You finally feel as though you can relax … until the day when the phone calls stop, the new customers vanish, and you can’t understand why.

You’re still providing excellent service and your existing customers love you, but your business is struggling. You learn from an existing customer that your company has some very negative reviews posted online. It dawns on you that your online reputation is presenting a twisted perception of reality that is really killing your business.

Sound like the plot of a B-movie drama? It’s true for hundreds, if not thousands, of businesses across the country.

Local Business Reviews = Reputation
What people say about your company online has become the single most important reflection of your company’s skill, quality, and reliability. It doesn’t matter if you’re a dentist, a plastic surgeon, a carpet cleaner, or a painter. In Nielsen’s most recent Global Trust in Advertising study, 70 % of global consumers indicated they trust online reviews from strangers when making purchasing decisions.

Improving Your Reputation is Your # 1 Marketing Priority
Your number one marketing priority should be developing a 5-star online reputation. Why? All your other marketing efforts, whether they be online such as SEO, social media, PPC, or offline such as direct mail, magazines, radio, or TV, will ultimately lead the consumer to learn more about you online. There, your less than sterling or non-existent reputation drives them away.

Most business owners fail to realize is that what consumers want is information that will help them feel confident they’re making the best, most well-reasoned purchase. Today, quite a bit of that confidence comes in the form of online reviews reflecting others’ experiences.

The 3Rs and 2Qs of Local Reviews and Reputation
When it comes to taking an active role in developing, building, and protecting your online reputation, you need to keep five points in mind:

Range— While it might seem as though getting a few positive reviews on Google+ or Yelp is all that’s needed, we advocate a wide-ranging approach to online review management. Just visit this Facebook page, We Hate Yelp, or read this thread on Google, and you’ll understand why. Your business is too important to you and your loved ones to let its success be dictated by one or two companies with no vested interest.
Real— Make sure real client reviews are getting posted. It’s tempting to game the system and pen some glowing reviews, however, it’s not only unethical, you’ll undoubtedly get caught, and that can have some unintended consequences.
Recent— It appears that more recent reviews weigh more heavily by the search engines in terms of ranking. For this reason alone, creating a steady stream of new, positive reviews makes sense. Additionally, the fact that more recent reviews pack more powerful social proof with potential customers than older reviews, and you simply must put systems in place to continually gather reviews.
Quantity— Ask yourself: If one dentist has 25 reviews with a 4-star average and the next best has one 5-star review, who are you going to call? Reliability is proven with consistency, particularly where reviews are concerned.
Quality— This one is pretty obvious: The higher your reviews, the better your status will be– within reason. A business with nothing but 5-star ratings can look suspicious but, in general, the more favorable your reviews, the better.
Make Reviews Part of a Comprehensive Reputation Marketing Strategy
While review and reputation building arguably may be the single most important online marketing tactic for local businesses in 2013 and beyond, the most successful businesses won’t stop there. Since reviews are most prominently displayed in conjunction with the hyper-local maps of search engines, they don’t generate many leads outsidePoor Online Reputation Reveiws Image this area.

For the vast majority of businesses serving multiple cities from a single location, reviews should be just one building block in a larger reputation marketing strategy. That strategy should employ SEO to ensure the company’s website ranks near the top in all the cities they serve for their most important buying phrases. The good news is there’s a positive, synergistic relationship between a strong review presence, well-optimized local pages, and an authoritative website.

With the dominance mobile devices display in local purchasing, companies should make sure their websites not only rank highly, but are also mobile-friendly with click-to-call, click-to-map, and other navigable engagement features. You want to remove as much friction as possible between your customer’s need and his ability to contact you.

  1. One Hidden– but Powerful– Benefit of Positive Reviews
    Clearly, your business needs to put a review-gathering, reputation marketing culture, and process in place. The investment you make will return outsized profits from the new customers you’ll attract. There is one other “hidden” benefit that an outstanding online reputation will bring: pricing power.
  2. For years, nearly every business has struggled to defend its price in a world of “me too” competitors. Imagine how easy it will be to respond to “Why should I pay more for your service?” when you can simply reply, “Have you taken a look online to see what our customers say?”.
  3. Companies need to leverage the power a 5-star reputation brings. You’ve worked hard to establish your business and sacrificed plenty along the way. Are you willing to let that hard work get flushed down the drain because of a single disgruntled customer or competitor?

Develop a system to ensure your biggest fans are louder than your biggest enemies; the payoff is worth it.

You learn from an existing customer that your company has some very negative reviews posted online. In Nielsen’s most recent Global Trust in Advertising study, 70 % of global consumers indicated they trust online reviews from strangers when making purchasing decisions.

Range— While it might seem as though getting a few positive reviews on Google+ or Yelp is all that’s needed, we advocate a wide-ranging approach to online review management. Additionally, the fact that more recent reviews pack more powerful social proof with potential customers than older reviews, and you simply must put systems in place to continually gather reviews.
For the vast majority of businesses serving multiple cities from a single location, reviews should be just one building block in a larger reputation marketing strategy.

IF you need help or you’re curious about your online reputation, contact us on our website OR call us, we LOVE to chat (412) 374-1558.

By the way, if you’re thinking that since they charge more than $2,500/month on the West Coast for this service that our price would be similar…NOPE! Our service is less than $9/day AND encompasses 4 additional lead generation services that theirs does not!! Cool, huh??

 

Here’s to Your Online Reputation!

Alex, MPeMG

www.MPeMG.com

(412)n 374-1558

(We actually answer our own phones!)

There’s Digital Space JUST For Restaurants & Event Industries

It’s True: 64 % Of Mobile Restaurant Searchers Convert “Immediately Or Within An Hour”

Restaurants are consistently the top local and mobile search category according to considerable query log data from multiple sources. The Telmetrics-xAd study reinforces this.

Mobile Resataurants SearchThe study found that 95 percent of smartphone users conduct restaurant searches. It also found that 90 percent of these users “convert within the day,” meaning they go out to eat. Perhaps more striking is the fact that 64 percent were found to covert either “immediately” or “within one hour.” This is reminiscent of the 2010 statement by Microsoft-Bing that 70 percent of mobile search users complete a search-related task within an hour vs. one week on the PC.

Tablet and smartphone user behaviors are not the same, however. While that may now be common knowledge, the study documented some specific differences in the restaurants category:

    While 64 percent of smartphone restaurant searchers convert within an hour, just 44 percent of tablet owners do so

  •     In the context of restaurant search most smartphones are used “on the go” (outside the home) while tablets are used primarily in the home.
  •     Tablet users are more likely to look for reviews and menus; smartphone owners are more likely to look for directions or call restaurants
  • As indicated, the top activities among restaurant searchers varied by device. Among smartphone owners the hierarchy of activities was the following:

                 -Call a restaurant

                 –Look up directions

                 –Look up locations near me

  • Tablet owners were much more in “research mode” and were more likely to do the following:

                  –Look at ratings and reviews

                  –Find online coupons and promotions

                  –Research menu / specific food items

The study also discovered that more tablet and smartphone owners used mobile websites more often but considerably more time was spent with mobile apps. Accordingly, 70 percent of total time spent with restaurant content on mobile devices took place in apps. In other words, the mobile web saw greater reach but users were much more engaged with  mobile apps. This is a microcosm of larger mobile user behavior patterns.Yelp - Review Image

One of the more interesting findings — one that is positive for mobile advertisers — is that “3 out of 5” mobile restaurant seekers had no particular place in mind upon embarking on their research. In addition, 75 percent of study participants reported noticing mobile ads. So the capacity for marketers to influence mobile user behavior in this category would appear to be great.

Use of technology

One-quarter of consumers say technology options are important features that factor into their decision to choose a restaurant – and experts anticipate this will continue to grow.

    70% of smartphone users view restaurant menus on their phones at least a few times per year.

    34% of consumers say technology makes them dine out or order takeout or delivery more often.

6 in 10 chefs encourage consumers to take photos of their food and post it on social media – they consider it free advertising.

(To grab your FREE “Power of Online Directories” Cheat Sheet, visit: http://0s4.com/r/JPFCZV)

Restaurants are the most searched for local topic and the most popular industry to search for on mobile devices, with more than 80 percent of searchers looking for places to eat either on a mobile web browser or mobile app. In order to drive visibility through search results and drive sales, local and mobile optimization is a must for any restaurant.

                                                  Conclusion

Mobile Review ImageLocal and mobile consumers actively search out review and menu information before making a purchasing decision. Restaurants that make this information available to search engines like Yahoo! and Google to prominently display to searchers will be at an advantage compared to local competitors. For restaurants, dominating local and mobile search is about proving the information searchers want as easily and quickly as possible. Google and Yahoo! are helping restaurants do that, but restaurants need to be proactive in disseminating information, making it available to search engines, and eventually local searchers.

To Higher Profits in the New Year!

Alex, MPeMG

www.MPeMG.com

(412) 215-3650

We Answer Our Phones!